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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. christmas break is already over for president obama. he's flying back to washington tonight and aides say he's ready for a deal. it's not clear whether this trip is a sign of compromises to come or another display of theater showing the president is willing to work even as his opponents skip town. meanwhile, though, americans are growing skeptical. in the last week alone, gallup found a 15-point drop in the number of americans who think congress will negotiate a deal on the fiscal cliff. that's not all, holiday spending also hit its lowest rate since the 2008 recession, which retailers are blaming on the uncertainty in washington. so where do we go from here? well, since the house failed to get a vote on the tax package last week, all eyes are on the senate. a temporary deal that would basically extend all the tax cuts for those making under a quarter million. the deal would also rescue long-term unemployment benefits and instead of addressing those automatic spending cuts we've all heard about that are set for january 1st, this temporary deal would delay them for another six months. few are
and i have a pretty frank conversation about just how far apart we are. >> joining us now, washington post columnist and msnbc political policy analyst, ezra klein. ezra, we keep asking the same questions and each day sort of have the same answer, but i ask you, my friend, is anything happening here or nothing happening here, what do you make of the $1.4 trillion number and the news today republicans aren't giving ground on the bush tax cuts? >> i don't make much of it. what was interesting to me, not much of the deals have leaked. that means the negotiations are going fairly well. a couple weeks ago, everything leaked immediately as soon as anybody said it. it means they are trying to talk. one thing i think we sometimes forget, the two sides disagree in a big way. boehner doesn't want to or think he can sell his members on a big tax increase, and president obama, particularly if he's not going to get the tax increase, is not going to go for big entitlement cuts. the underlying problem, the one nobody is knowing how to solve, is what breaks the actual disagreement here. and as of yet
juice," and in the nation's capitol, cnbc's chief washington correspondent, john harwood. we have our sage of capitol hill luke russert on set here. you're holding it down in the nation's capital. in firms of the discussions of the fiscal cliff, the white house is focused solely on cuts for top earners. almost no discussion of unemployment insurance and payroll taxes, the farm bill which would include the price of milk and food stamps on a broader level. at what point do these become sticking points in the negotiation? >> reporter: they're going to become sticking points and probably before the end of the year, because remember there are a couple of things going on. if the president gets a deal on rates, republicans are going to be less inclined to go along with some of the other things, like extended unemployment insurance and some sort of extension perhaps in different form of the payroll tax cut. but also to avoid the sequestration, the congress has got to find some way to have cuts in the interim. if they kick the can down the road they have to have month by month cuts. the farm b
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)